Accommodations

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Anar Aqda

“Anar Aqda” is an ecolodge located in “Aqda” city, near “Ardakan”, in “Yazd” province. “Yazd” is located 270 km (170 mi) southeast of “Esfahan”. Since 2017, the historical city of Yazd is recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. “Aqda” is a historical city where inherit the special Iranian Architecture used in “Yazd”. This accommodation in Aqda city has 15 rooms and constructed in 2 floors with brick and adobe with especial traditional architecture of the building, a beautiful Yard and lovely environment where in afternoons you can stand next to the building’s historical wind-catcher at the roof of the building and watch beautiful sunset from the top of city and feel just relaxed and amused. Anar ecolodge is mostly well-known because of pomegranate trees and its awesome garden that gives you the chance and permission to walk through the trees, pick up some pomegranates by your own, take photos and just enjoy this fantastic experience.
Here is a place with 300 years old history in its heart, which date back to safavid dynasty.  All of the people here are Persian but some of them have zoroastrian religion that’s why you can also find firetemples and zoroastrian shirine near here like chak chak temple. You can visit Shirkouh Mountain and its beautiful unique nature as well. Aqda is 35 km away from “Ardakan”, 74 km from “Na’in” and 90 km from “Yazd”.
There are plenty of tourist attractions in Aqda and near this accommodation such as: Aqda congregational mosque, caravanserai and huge entrance of Aqda city, carpet museum of Ardakan, “Khalou Mirza” historical house, “Rig-zarrin” camp, anthropology museum and desert touring.
You can also visit Yazd and its special architecture during your stay in Iran.
Because of generations of adaptations to its desert surroundings, Yazd has a unique Persian architecture. It is nicknamed the “City of Windcatchers” (Shahr-e Badgirha) from its many examples. It is also very well known for its Zoroastrian fire temples, ab anbars (cisterns), qanats (underground channels), yakhchals (coolers), Persian handicrafts, handwoven cloth (Persian termeh), silk weaving, Persian Cotton Candy, and its time-honored confectioneries.

 

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For those who want to know more about “Yazd” province :

You can plan to see Aqda, Ardakan, Abarkuh, Mehriz, Taft, Fahraj and Yazd during your trip and throughout your journey to these amazing desert parts of Iran since these cities are located in Yazd province and are connected to each other with a short distance. All of them have wonderful tourist attractions.
Yazd province in central Iran has been a manifestation of the brightest cultural heritage and ancient civilization throughout history with human settlement in Yazd dating back to the third millennium BCE. Tribes, who migrated from Balkh to Pars, called this land ‘Yazdan’ during the Pishdadi era.
Yazd is the first adobe city in the world and is the second historical city after Venice, Italy.
Yazd is known as the city of wind towers. In fact, wind towers improve ventilation. They can be seen in residential units and ancient houses.
Yazd’s historical monuments include Yazd Jame’ Mosque, Seyyed Rokneddin Mausoleum,  Amir Chaqmaq Complex, Lariha House, Alexander Prison, Narin Castle, Chak Chak Temple and Water Museum. In addition, 77 localities of Yazd known as ‘Yazd Historical Texture’ were registered as No. 15,000 on the National Heritage List in 2005. Gharbal Biz (Mehriz), Tamehr (near Taft) and Masih (Harat) are among the important springs of Yazd.
Due to certain climatic and economic conditions as well as its remoteness, the inhabitants of Yazd have been involved in making handicrafts. Yazd handicrafts have garnered the attention of artisans and art-lovers across the country since olden times.
The historical city of Yazd in central Iran has become the country’s 22nd world heritage site after the World Heritage Committee voted in favor of its inscription on Sunday during the committee’s 41st session in Krakow, Poland. Almost 200 hectares of the city’s 2,270-hectare historical texture now boast world heritage status.
Yazd is now the only UNESCO-listed Iranian city where people still live. It is also believed to be the world’s largest inhabited adobe city. Yazd is home to UNESCO-listed ancient Persian qanats as well as Dolat Abad Garden, which is one of nine Iranian gardens inscribed collectively on the World Heritage List as “the Persian Gardens”. The city is known for its adobe architecture, Zoroastrian fire temples and tall structures known as badgirs, or wind-catchers, which in ancient times functioned as natural ventilation in large buildings. With 22 world heritage sites, Iran is ranked first in the Middle East and eleventh worldwide.
The historical structure of Yazd is a collection of public-religious architecture with a very large scope comprising of Islamic architectural elements extending over different periods of history in harmonious combination with climatic conditions.
Iran nominated Arasbaran Protected Zone in East Azarbaijan Province and the historical city of Yazd for 2017 UNESCO World Cultural Heritage listing.
Yazd is also one of the most important desert cities of Iran. The city bears distinct signs of innovation and creativity, a majority of which were promoted between the 10th and 20th centuries CE.
The cultural outlook of Yazd is yet to be modernized and as a result the majority of the monuments including mosques, minarets, houses and cisterns perfectly mirror ancient Islamic-Iranian architecture.
One can see diverse eco-friendly architectural styles in Yazd, as if the ancient habitats were aware of the principles of sustainable development. Ancient residents of the city tried to apply wind, soil, and water energies in a way not to damage the environment.

 

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For those who want to know more about Zoroastrian religion of Yazd’z people :

The name “Yazd” is derived from Yazdegerd I, a Sassanid ruler of Persia. The city was definitely a Zoroastrian center during Sassanid times. The word yazd means God. After the Arab conquest of Iran, many Zoroastrians migrated to Yazd from neighboring provinces. By paying a levy, Yazd was allowed to remain Zoroastrian even after its conquest, and Islam only gradually became the dominant religion in the city.

Because of its remote desert location and the difficulty of access, Yazd remained largely immune to large battles and the destruction and ravages of war. For instance, it was a haven for those fleeing from destruction in other parts of Persian Empire during the Mongol invasion. In 1272 it was visited by “Marco Polo”, who remarked on the city’s fine silk-weaving industry. In the book “The Travels of Marco Polo”, he described “Yazd” in the following way:

“It is a good and noble city, and has a great amount of trade. They weave there quantities of a certain silk tissue known as Yasdi, which merchants carry into many quarters to dispose of. When you leave this city to travel further, you ride for seven days over great plains, finding harbour to receive you at three places only. There are many fine woods producing dates upon the way, such as one can easily ride through; and in them there is great sport to be had in hunting and hawking, there being partridges and quails and abundance of other game, so that the merchants who pass that way have plenty of diversion. There are also wild asses, handsome creatures. At the end of those seven marches over the plain, you come to a fine kingdom which is called “Kerman”.”

 

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For those who want to know more about “Aqda” City:

ʿAQDĀ, a small settlement and subdistrict (dehestān) in the district (baḵš) of “Ardakān-e Yazd” lying at 32° 30’ north latitude and 53° 36’ east longitude on the road connecting Yazd with Nāʾīn and Isfahan, at a distance of 74 km from Nāʾīn and 100 km from Yazd.

In medieval Islamic times, ʿAqdā was regarded as an administrative dependency of Yazd and as marking the frontier between Yazd and Nāʾīn, the latter being sometimes reckoned to Yazd and sometimes to Isfahan. Nothing is known of its pre-Islamic history, despite a popular etymology for its name connecting it with a Sasanian commander called ʿAqdār, who is said to have constructed there a qanāt and fortress and to have established a village.
The population is now wholly Muslim, but formerly there were Zoroastrians at ʿAqdā, which was also referred to as Deh-e Gabrān (the village of Zoroastrians). Josafat Barbaro visited what he calls “Guerde” in 1474 and mentions there several “Abraini” (i.e., “Abrahamites” = Zoroastrians). ʿAqdā (“Agda”) was further visited in 1621 by the Silesian traveler Heinrich von Posen und Gross-Nedlitz, who journeyed from Isfahan eastwards along the southern fringes of the Great Desert—the first European to do so—to Ṭabas, Bīrǰand and Afghanistan.At present, the dehestān of ʿAqdā comprises twenty villages, some on the desert fringes and some on the mountain slopes to the south.

The monuments of ʿAqdā and its dependencies have been listed. Those of ʿAqdā itself include the rebāṭ or caravanserai of the merchant Ḥāǰǰī Abu’l-Qāsem Raštī (1262/1846), now the police station; a cistern (1027/1617-18); a Ḥosaynīya (1292/1875) for the performance of passion plays and other Shiʿite mourning rites; a bath (1055/1645); ruinous fortresses popularly connected with Ḵᵛāǰa Naṣīr-al-dīn Ṭūsī and the ancient Iranian hero Sām; the Jāmeʿ mosque (ca. 8th/14th century); the Holākū mosque (1123/1711); and the Šams mosque (1090/1679). In the environs, noteworthy are the rebāṭ of Ḵargūšī built by Shah ʿAbbās I in 1024/1625, a 7th/13th century mosque at Haftādor, and a Zoroastrian shrine of Būnāpars (Bānū-ye Pārs?) at Zarǰūʿ or Zarjū to the south of ʿAqdā .

Hotel Overview

Room 1
room 1- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
room 1- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
10

per person

2 single beds
in-room bath+ toilet

Room 2
room 2- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
room 2- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
10

per person

2 beds / double
in-room bath+ toilet
in-room refrigerator

Room 3
room 3- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
room 3- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
10

per person

2 beds
shared bath

Room 4
room 4- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
room 4- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
10

per person

2 single beds
in-room bath+ toilet

Room 5
room 5- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
room 5- anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
10

10

2 beds / double
shared bath

Room 6
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
anar ecolodge
10

per person

1 single bed + 1 double bed (for 3 persons)
in-room bath

Contact Us

CJRG+8Q Aqda, Yazd Province, Iran

+98 913 533 91 00

anaraqda@gmail.com